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Today’s Phones and Tablets Will Die Out Like the PC

The personal computer is dying. Its place in our lives as the primary means of computing will soon end. Mobile computing—the cell phone in your pocket or the tablet in your purse—has been a great bridging technology, connecting the familiar past to a formative future. But mobile is not the destination. In many ways mobile devices belong more to the dying PC model than to the real future of computing.

Blog  frogs on the road

frog at Mobile World Congress Recap

Last week, frog took part in Mobile World Congress (MWC) in Barcelona, the world’s largest gathering of the telecom industry (with a record 70,000 attendees this year) and an increasingly important forum for everything that falls under the rubric “Connected World.”

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M-Commerce 2.0

Telco 2.0 is a London-based research firm focusing on innovative business models for the telco industry. It cultivates a strong network of decision-makers from communicatons, media, banking, and technology and runs several industry conferences. frog is an official sponsor of this year’s Telco 2.0 New Digital Economics conference, M-Commerce 2.0: How Personal Data Will Revolutionize Customer Engagement.

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Facebook in Cairo: Not What You Thought


Social media amulets in Cairo

Aboard this Air Egypt flight from Cairo to Munich, I am grateful for five hours in limbo before being deposited back into Western life. After a week on the ground in Cairo with Jan Chipchase and other colleagues from frog design, I have a sharpened understanding of how little I know about this region. Anyone who has spent time talking to people on both sides of "the line" in Egypt is struck by the monumental gap between those found in the poor, illiterate corners of the city and the fountain-ringed office parks filled with the savvy Egyptian businessmen educated in the best schools the West has to offer. Our research traversed much of this continuum. While we were not in the poorest of poor areas (meaning, communities living in and mining garbage dumps), our interviewees ranged from the latte-sipping, shisha-smoking students wearing designer clothing to the tea peddlers in dusty, goat-filled alleys. When I asked, with the assistance of my translator, if they used Facebook, faces lit with a smile and a nod—even in the goat-inhabited corners.

Blog  frogs on the road

frog's Panel Picks at SXSWi 2011

In a few days, herds of nerds, tech geeks, and entrepreneurs will descend upon Austin, Texas, for the conference where technology, design, and social media converge in a hyper social explosion—SXSW Interactive 2011. 

A lot of veterans are offering all types of sage advice on how to transcend noob status (download that scheduling app and stay hydrated!), and how to savor the most out of the info-packed sessions brought to you by the digerati themselves. In the spirit of sharing (SXSWi content is part of the sharing vs. privacy debate), we’ve put together the beta version of frog’s itinerary—an open attempt to tackle the 500-plus panels with some kind of finesse.

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Will Android Rule the World?

If the jam-packed Android booth at Mobile World Congress, the ubiquity of the robot logo, and the line of people queuing up 2 hours ahead of Erik Schmidt's (swan song) keynote, then the answer is "yes." The booth actually had a nice vibe to it; though it was crowded, it was also quite easy going and people were enjoying themselves. There was a nice smoothie bar making interesting flavored drinks named after Android releases (Honeycomb, etc.). The entire space was really focused on app and hardware partners showing off their wares (all wearing matching t-shirts no doubt provided by Google - take that fragmentation!)

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The Message from the Top: Competition, Open-ness

The message on the second day of Mobile World Congress from the heads of AT&T, Vodafone, Telefonica, China Mobile and American Movil was unambiguous: competition, open-ness and cross-carrier interoperability are what is needed to take mobile to the next level. (Perhaps in the spirit of interoperability, all five gentlemen were wearing blue ties, mostly with dots.)

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Feeling the Love at Mobile World Congress 2011

We're in romantic Barcelona, it's Valentine's day, and love is in the air. Specifically, if you're Steve Ballmer giving today's keynote, a whole lotta love for: Windows Phone 7, app and development partners, device partners, carriers, ecosystems, design and user experience, and especially love for Nokia. Stephen Elop, CEO of Nokia, returned the love by appearing on stage to give a rousing defense of the new Microsoft/Nokia partnership.

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Mobilizing for the Mobile World Congress

In recent months, we’ve been spreading the word about connected devices, the future of mobile money, and how the “Internet of things” is going wireless. Now, frog will host and facilitate a series of interactive workshops and presentations on those subjects at the Mobile World Congress, the mobile industry’s leading conference held in Barcelona from February 14–17.

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No Photos Please

Jan Chipchase talks at the Economist’s Human Potential 2010 conference in New York about Afghanistan, “extreme research locations,” and a shift in how design researchers do work. 

frog Executive Creative Director Jan Chipchase gave a keynote presentation at the Economist’s Human Potential 2010 conference in New York on September 16, 2010. The talk was born out of his recent trip to Afghanistan where he did a field study on how people use cell phones to do their banking — known in the industry as “mobile money.” While he is still processing the findings of his research, he revealed new insights on the practice of design research — specifically on doing research in unusual and “extreme research locations” such as the Middle East. “Five years ago when we were conducting street research, one of our team would document the research with a camera; it was a one way process,” he said. “Three years ago …[people] would bring out their camera phones and start documenting us…. In three year’s time you’ll be able to point camera phone at someone’s face and know within a reasonable time-frame and level of certainty who they are, their history and their history of interactions.”