Blog  DesignWell

Gamification for Healthcare Products: Avoiding Common Pitfalls

Perhaps the greatest challenge designers face when creating new products intended to improve a person’s health is ensuring proper use and adherence. A user may adopt the product initially with optimism or even enthusiasm, but over time, we often see waning engagement and inconsistent use.  This is a big problem when the efficacy of the product depends on long-term use.

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Backpack PLUS Will Empower Community Health Workers

Most children in the developing world will never see a doctor or visit a clinic, relying instead on Community Health Workers (CHWs) who are a critical link in delivering basic healthcare to underserved populations. Every day this dedicated and largely volunteer network of CHWs visit patients, help screen for life-threatening diseases and dispense medication, often with little training or support.

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Aging in Place #4: frogs making

Our Aging in Place initiative is focused on exploring product and service solutions that encourage the continued autonomy, independence and wellbeing of seniors who are aging at home. After our initial research and ideation phases, we found ourselves returning to a core set of themes that were fundamental to each of the varied seniors we interviewed: Identity – “Help me stay ME,” Sociability – “Help me stay engaged,” Routine – “Help me stay in control,” and Activity – “Help me stay mentally and physically active.”

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Healthy Baby: Helping Newborns in Developing Countries Get a Better Start in Life

This healthy baby.

Up to 50 percent of all neo-natal deaths in the developing world occur within the first 24 hours of delivery, largely the result of inadequate access to healthcare and precarious conditions at birth. In this perilous environment, how can high infant mortality rates be reduced? That was the challenge frog was asked to solve by Bill Gates, as part of his guest editor stint for Wired magazine’s December 2013 issue focusing on lifesaving innovations. Jonas Damon, frog creative director and project lead, discusses frog’s prototype for a holistic support system to help mothers and vulnerable newborns.

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Envisioning Healthcare for 2031

The Innovation Learning Network meet twice a year and brings together the most innovative healthcare organizations in the country to share the joys and pains of innovation.  Earlier this year frog hosted the ILN in the Space Needle in Seattle. The front-line innovators and leaders in healthcare explored how to take advantage of gaming ideas and principles to inspire innovation in the serious world of healthcare.

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Google Health’s Failure to Bring Meaning to Data

When Google announced Friday that it was pulling the plug on Google Health, we received dozens of calls asking, “If Google can’t make it in health, who can?” But we actually think we should be looking at Google’s failure as a strong sign of where the electronic medical record (EMR) and personal health record (PHR) space is headed. To use the Gartner Hype Cycle reference we are in the “Trough of Disillusionment,” where technology fails to meet expectations and is abandoned. But, some businesses will persist and continue through the “Slope of Enlightenment” and experiment to understand the true benefits and practical application of the technology for the consumer. We also think Google’s failure is a confirmation that consumers are finally expecting healthcare products and services to rise to the same level as other industries. frog finds this in our healthcare research all the time; patients and physicians now expect their PHR/EMR to provide all the intuitive functionality and connectivity as their smart phones and tablets. If they don’t, they won’t adopt these technologies. Google Health failed on two primary dimensions: failure to create a connected and meaningful solution.

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Playing with Collective Intelligence: ILN Summit Day Two

A majority of the first two days at the ILN summit has been focused on how games can motivate and make visible our behaviors around health. In this sense, we’ve been learning about how games can teach us knew ways of being, but one of the most provocative talks of the summit explored how we can inform (and educate) games.

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Gamification 101: ILN Summit Day One

Today at Seattle’s Space Needle, frog design kicked off “Changing the Game,” a health conference in partnership with the Innovation Learning Network, where front-line innovators and leaders in healthcare will explore how to take advantage of gaming ideas and principles to inspire innovation in the serious world of healthcare. The morning was about breaking in the skeptics and getting them to expand their understanding of how gaming can be used to actually create change. frog’s Director of Business Development Teaque Lenahan coaxed the apprehensive luddites  critics , with a nod from the Journal of American Medicine that states,  “Health games represent an emerging tool that must be considered by community health centers, accountable care organizations, and patient centered medical homes.”

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freeHealth

About a month ago, frogs participated in a Health 2.0 code-a-thon hosted by Google in Mountain View. You may remember Alex Tam's winning Healthy Commute concept at the last event.  The day’s goal was to design and build new healthcare tools by bringing together developers, designers, and healthcare stakeholders. Raw data sets, such as the OpenGov data, helped inspire creative ideas to improve health.

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Gaming for Health, Playing to Win

On Dec 11 and 12, 2010, nearly one hundred people gathered at frog design’s San Francisco studio for Health Games Camp. This diverse group of people included healthcare practitioners, game developers, user experience designers, entrepreneurs, and more, all with an interest in improving healthcare behaviors. This quasi-unconference, quasi-workshop used multi-level game play as the framework to create practical game-based solutions for real health problems. Julian Keith Loren from Innovation Management Institute and David Schafran played the role of Game Masters of the weekend’s activities, setting the structure of the event and tirelessly corralling, engaging and challenging the participants to push to improve healthcare games.